COROLLA, N.C. — Many people have been wondering if the Outer Banks' Wild Horses will evacuate when Hurricane Dorian moves past the Carolina coast. 

According to the Corolla Wild Horse Fund, the horses are staying put.

Corolla wrote on Facebook that the wild horses are actually better equipped to handle a hurricane than most humans living on the Outer Banks.

Officials said the horses will go to high ground, under the sturdy live oak trees to ride the storm out. 

"Remember, they’ve been doing this for 500 years," Corolla wrote. 

The rescue farm is still prepping the area to prepare for the monster storm. Workers have gathered extra hay and grain and have filled up troughs with extra water.

The wild horses also have ID tags braided into their manes, and the herd manager will be riding out the storm at the farm with them.

"We know that it’s really disappointing to have your vacation cut short, but it’s for your own safety and the safety of our OBX first responders," Corolla wrote. "And believe us, if it floods and we lose electricity you will really wish you’d gone home before the storm hit. It’s not fun. For all our local friends and neighbors who are staying, good luck, be safe, and remember...butts to the wind!" 

The wild horses are better equipped to handle a hurricane than most ... of us humans living on the Outer Banks. They go to high ground, under the sturdy live oak trees to ride the storm out. Remember, they've been doing this for 500 years! At the rescue farm, final prep is being completed now.

HURRICANE DORIAN

Millions of people are boarding up and evacuating as Hurricane Dorian continues to move northwest toward the Carolina coast Wednesday morning. 

According to the National Hurricane Center, the center of Dorian, which is now a Category 2 hurricane with 105 mph winds, will move near or over the coast of South Carolina and North Carolina Thursday through Friday morning. Forecasters expect the Carolinas to experience tropical storm conditions Wednesday before the center of the storm reaches the area. 

OTHER STORIES ON WCNC