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Roll it up, slather it on bread and you’ve got avocado toast anywhere you go.

If this product seems too ridiculous to be true, you’re right. Although this is a real social media post, it's clearly satire. 

“Unnecessary inventions” page says they solve problems that don’t exist and “pokes fun at the real products people will actually purchase.”

Put simply, it’s FAKE. Many of you may have immediately gotten the joke but as the comments prove, many people fell for it.

VERIFY: Moldy Avocado
Facebook

So why does this matter? Well, it turns out satire sites are getting dangerously better at tricking people into believing something that’s fake.

There’s an entire page on Reddit dedicated to satire. Some key examples:

A Twitter user angry that the President tweeted about Demi Lovato. 

Donald TruNp tweet
Twitter

Nope. Notice the accounts name is misspelled as @realDonaldTrunp instead of Trump.

Here’s a lengthy list of angry responses to a video of a man locking himself in a hot car to quote “prove that babies and dogs are cowards.”

ClickHole Verify Example
Youtube

But what some viewers didn't realize was that the video was created and posted on a satirical website ClickHole.com 

We’re showing these because all it takes is TWO SIMPLE STEPS to figure out they’re all fake.

  1. Look at the name - Trump is misspelled in the example above and the name of the group in the first post is literally “unnecessary inventions.” If it doesn't look right, continue to step two. 

  2. Check out their site or brand. Look for  “satire, parody, joke “ or anything similar.  

There’s nothing wrong with falling for these jokes, but taking those extra steps can help cut down on the spread of parody information and fake news.