HOUSTON — Retired FBI agents say Dennis Tuttle and Rhogena Nicholas may not seem like the stereotypical drug dealers, but their actions speak volumes.

Dennis Franks has experience developing criminal profiles and says with drugs, you try not to stand out.

“The really smart ones are the ones who try to blend in. They don’t raise attention,” said Franks.

Neighbors say Dennis walked his dog, Rhogena grabbed the occasional coffee and for the most part they kept to themselves. They gave the illusion of a normal home for 20 years.

Elizabeth Ferrari is Dennis’ sister who drove from Dallas overnight to see if the reports were true. Grief began to sink in once she saw the bullet-riddled windows.

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She says she had a conversation with Dennis not long ago and didn’t notice anything out of the ordinary.

“It’s not unusual to find people involved in drug trafficking who you wouldn’t think were involved in it,” said Franks.

Franks says the Tuttles were unique in at least one sense.

“When I found out they were in their 50’s, I was surprised myself,” said Franks.

Had they been in their 20’s or 30’s, possible gang members, he says it would have explained their impulsive and violent actions.

At 50, with virtually no criminal history, Franks says the Tuttles should have been able to think in a more rational manner.

Franks says it’s for that reason, he believes there had to have been more factors involved into what motivated their actions.

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Were they under the influence? Did they lose their jobs? Was money a problem?

All questions, Franks says would paint a clearer picture of Dennis and Rhogena’s intentions.

“You just never know what’s going on inside another house. It’s not that everyone should be suspicious, but it’s just another example of truth is stranger than fiction sometimes,” said Franks.