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Facebook removes Houston serial killer's profile page

HOUSTON - Facebook has responded to a subpoena from Texas prison officials and has removed the profile page of convicted serial killer, Elmer Wayne Henley Jr. 
Facebook page for convicted serial killer Elmer Wayne Henley Jr.

HOUSTON - Facebook has responded to a subpoena from Texas prison officials and has removed the profile page of convicted serial killer, Elmer Wayne Henley Jr. 

Almost 43 years have passed since police unearthed the corpses from what became known as Houston mass murders, but the memories still haunt the families of the 30 victims. 

"How do you find peace in that when you've got this constant reminder of what this man did to our brothers and our sons. It's not easy." said Cyndi Yates, the sister of one of the victims. 

Yates' 14-year-old brother Danny was one of the boys tortured and murdered by a sadistic pedophile named Dean Corll with the help of two teenagers named David Brooks and Elmer Wayne Henley Jr. - both of whom are now serving life sentences. 

Earlier this week, KHOU 11 News reported someone has apparently been helping Henley maintain a Facebook page, complete with photographs of Henley taken in prison and pictures of his artwork and jewelry. The merchandise is reportedly being sold on another website that markets so-called "murderabilia." 

When she saw the page, Yates contacted Texas prison officials. 

"He's trying to make a profit off being a serial killer of my brother and these boys and it makes me angry you know, and keeps me in a place of unforgiveness because this guy won't stay out of my face." Yates said.

After prison officials contacted Facebook, the social media giant agreed to take down the page. 

"I'll tell you, obviously your story must have been the catalyst for change, because within 24 hours after your story airs, Elmer Wayne Henley's Facebook page is gone, ceased, no longer up there." said Andy Kahan, a Houston victims rights advocate. 

A prison spokesman tells KHOU 11 News Facebook said its community standards were violated by the page bearing the name of Houston's most notorious serial killer.