NEW CANEY, Texas — Some of the shelves inside Mission Northeast’s warehouse are starving for re-stocking.

"Well, obviously, we gave out a lot more food than we normally do,” Executive Director Pam Singletary said.

Mission Northeast is a faith-based nonprofit that’s recently seen a big rise in need.

"The week after Imelda hit, which was pretty much Thursday," said Singletary.  "We opened on Friday and stayed open probably for the next 10 days without closing so that we could distribute things to people that needed them.”

Items handed out by the thousands of pounds included non-perishable food and much-needed cleaning supplies.

And they remain in demand among people who’ve been struck by up to three catastrophic floods within the last two years.

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"My RV's completely gone, cars are completely gone, everything’s gone,” said flood victim Joy Smith.

Smith said recovery would be impossible without assistance, like the voucher she used to buy groceries just before our interview.

"Not just from food banks," said Smith.  "Friends and family that have come in and helped us.”

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KHOU 11 News spoke with a couple of other local nonprofits stretched after Imelda as well.

They believe it's partly because of concentrated impact zones the greater Houston area may have forgotten.

Mission Northeast hopes to rebound enough to meet its next big rush during the holidays.

"Everything’s going as well as can be expected,” said Singletary.

Find out more about Mission Northeast at their website.

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