HOUSTON — Dementia has been called one of the biggest health challenges facing the world today.

There is no cure yet, but improving the lives of patients is the mission of a faith-based nonprofit called Amazing Place. 

It’s a day center in west Houston for people with mild to moderate forms of dementia. 

They can be dropped off by loved ones in the morning and then picked up in the afternoon.

The center has everything from card games to classes and seminars, and even dance lessons.

One of their clients is 85-year-old Sidney Buchanan who taught law for 42 years at the University of Houston. 

He says he loves it here. He’s often engaged in a game of bridge and says it stimulates his brain.

"Because you have to think about what you're doing and count your points and listen to what’s going on on the table, excellent for your mind,” says Buchanan.

"Dementia is a very isolating condition, people often stay home and withdraw, and we bring people back out to be with others," says Tracey Brown, Executive Director of Amazing Place.

It’s all designed to keep them engaged and stimulate their brains.

Even the food they serve is meant to be brain-healthy. Lots of fruits and vegetables.

The staff and volunteers at Amazing Place are hoping their clients can build new neural pathways in their brains and get the most out of their lives.

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