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'Mission accomplished' | Galveston County closes mass vaccination site

“Our goal was to get as many people vaccinated as quickly as possible, and I can honestly say, mission accomplished," Dr. Keiser said.

HOUSTON — Saturday was a big day for Galveston County.

They’ve officially closed their mass COVID-19 vaccine site at Walter Hall Park in League City. The hub was opened back in January, but county leaders say this closure is a good thing.

16-year-old Elana Anderson got the very last shot on the very last day of Galveston County’s mass vaccination site.

“Go ahead and put your arm up here for us," volunteer nurse Melissa Hughes told her. “Let us know if there’s any problem by beeping the horn, otherwise you are officially done. And we are closed!”

Elana didn’t win a prize, but she was still grateful.

“I got vaccinated," Elana said.

“The patients have been amazing, thankful, gracious," Hughes said.

Galveston County Local Health Authority Dr. Philip Keiser says the drive-thru site, which could give up to 5,000 shots a day, is now unnecessary.

“Our goal was to get as many people vaccinated as quickly as possible, and I can honestly say, mission accomplished," Dr. Keiser said. “We found that we don’t need this anymore. Over half the county has got at least one shot in arms right now. And we’re in a really good spot."

So they’re closing up shop and switching gears.

“And we’re going to ask people to start shifting to doctors’ offices, hospitals, pharmacies and other places to receive the vaccines when they so choose to get that," Galveston County Judge Mark Henry said.

The county is now focused on community outreach and offering vaccine appointments in traditional healthcare settings.

“We’re also going to be doing outreach. We’re going out to churches, we’re going out to community groups," Dr. Keiser said.

Dr. Keiser says they’re willing to get creative, asking people at restaurants or maybe partnering the port. They’re even looking at doing mass vaccinations inside schools.

“Of trying to reach people where they are. So that it’s not a problem of technology. It’s not a problem of access. It’s not a problem of understanding so that everyone who wants a vaccine can get it," Dr. Keiser said.

Whatever it takes to get more people vaccinated.