Watching Out for You: Eggs selections explained

HOUSTON – Are you making eggs for breakfast? We're cracking the code on eggs – from explaining the different labels to knowing the exact date they were put in the carton!

HOUSTON – Are you making eggs for breakfast? We're cracking the code on eggs – from explaining the different labels to knowing the exact date they were put in the carton!

Ever stop and notice all the egg options? You're not alone!

"I have I have and I can't tell any difference," Mary Humphries said.

For many of us, we simply judge an egg by its shell.

Loading ...

"My husband is more a brown person but I'm shopping today so we're getting white," Gracie Rubio said.

The only real differences in color – brown eggs are bigger and come from a darker hen.

"I know brown chickens lay brown eggs, and I prefer brown chickens," Dave Garza said.

Now let's crack the code on labels. The Humane Society says cage-free, free range and organic are very similar.

All chickens are uncaged and free to walk around and act like birds.

The only differences? Cage-free does not have outdoor access, and organic is regulated. Those hens must be on a strict diet.

All equal more cost to you.

All chickens are uncaged and free to walk around and act like birds. The only differences? Cage-free does not have outdoor access, and organic is regulated. Those hens must be on a strict diet.

"Like $2.57 for those versus $5.49 for those. OK I didn't even look at that," Rubio said.

Something else to notice – a three-digit code next to the expiration. That's called the Julian Date — the exact day of the year that the eggs were packaged.

Something else to notice – a three-digit code next to the expiration. That's called the Julian Date — the exact day of the year that the eggs were packaged.

Check for the biggest number to get the freshest carton and add that to your routine.

"The brand and size is primarily what I go for," Mary Humphries said.

So remember these little tips before putting all those eggs in your basket.