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DALLAS More people are opting to spend eternity next to their pets.

At Bluebonnet Pet Cemetery, owner David Stafford said three humans are buried beneath the ground there.

There is Mr. Preston Lee Davis. He was a World War II veteran, Stafford said. He's buried here, and his pet right in front of him.

The decorated war veteran, who fought in Iwo Jima, isn't buried in a veteran's cemetery, but a pet cemetery.

This area here is what we are trying to clear off, level off, Stafford said. This is the area we are going to use to bury pets and people with their pets.

At Bluebonnet, business is growing. Employees say they get calls almost daily from people wanting to be buried with their pets. Stafford said some people are inquiring about a plot even if they don't have pets.

It's something that is coming into demand because of the price, he said. It's cheaper to be buried with your pets than it is to be buried in a human cemetery.

Being buried in a pet cemetery is thousands of dollars cheaper. It costs an average of $8,000 to be buried in a human cemetery, compared to $300 in a pet cemetery, though you have to be cremated for a plot at a pet cemetery.

But cost isn't why most people are choosing a pet cemetery.

Ken Martin is 63 years old with no children -- his pets are his family.

It's a bond between them and you, Martin said. It's like that's your best friend ever. You don't have many best friends, but dogs are special.

Martin says he sees nothing wrong with having your best friend buried with you for eternity.

I've even thought if they were cremated, have them with me in my casket, he said.

But it's not that easy. In May, the Texas Banking Commission, which regulates funerals and cemeteries, ruled that pets can't be buried in human cemeteries, even though years ago it was allowed. News 8 found a cemetery with separate areas for human and animals.

I think if people wanted to, they should have the right to be buried next to their pet, said Kit Connelly, a self-proclaimed dog lover.

There's nothing in the state law that prohibits humans in pet cemeteries.

So some will take comfort, knowing they will forever be next to what they loved the most.

E-mail rlopez@wfaa.com

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