FAA warned airlines to avoid Crimea because of conflict

FAA warned airlines to avoid Crimea because of conflict

Credit: AFP/Getty Images

The seal of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) are seen on August 4, 2011 in Washington, DC. Top US Senate Democrat Harry Reid announced August 4 that polarized lawmakers had reached a stopgap deal to end a costly row that has shut airport construction and halted tax payments by airlines. "I am pleased to announce that we have been able to broker a bipartisan compromise between the House and the Senate to put 74,000 transportation and construction workers back to work," Reid said in a statement. The cash crunch has forced the FAA to temporarily lay off 4,000 non-essential personnel and halt work for 70,000 workers on airport construction projects, though top officials say air safety is not at risk AFP PHOTO/PAUL J. RICHARDS (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)

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by Bart Jansen / USA TODAY

khou.com

Posted on July 17, 2014 at 12:18 PM

During the hostilities between Ukraine and Russia, the threat of military action against a civilian airliner has been in the air for months.

The Federal Aviation Administration prohibited U.S. airlines in April from flying over Crimea, but because of concerns about air-traffic control rather than military action.

The FAA took the action April 25, which is to remain in effect for one year, because of a dispute between Ukraine and Russia about which country controlled the airspace in the Simferopol region, which covers the Crimean peninsula.

The Russian Federation declared March 28 that it controlled the airspace over Crimea, as well as international airspace above the Black Sea and Sea of Azov. In response, Ukraine created a prohibited area over the Crimean peninsula for flights below 29,000 feet.

Because of the dispute, the International Civil Aviation Organization, a branch of the United Nations, warned airlines April 3 to avoid the area.

"In addition, political and military tension between Ukraine and the Russian Federation remains high, and compliance with air traffic control instructions issued by the authorities of one country could result in a civil aircraft being misidentified as a threat and intercepted or otherwise engaged by air defense forces of the other country," FAA said.

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