Surveillance cameras prove to be strong tool in protecting loved ones in nursing homes

Surveillance video helps protect loved ones in nursing homes

DALLAS -- After a recent report of attempted sexual assault at a Dallas nursing home, experts are encouraging families to know their rights when it comes to protecting their loved ones.

Ngozi Nwokori knows her husband Timothy as a partner, a bishop seen in sermons posted to YouTube, and a nurse at Modern Senior Living Nursing Home.

"He's loved by everyone that comes around him," she said. "I'm not just saying that because he's my husband."

Court documents paint him in a different light. A resident of the home says she woke up overnight on Thursday to find Nwokori groping her. She told police he unzipped his pants, exposed himself and climbed on top of her, trying to rip the bed sheets from her hands. It was a noise in the hallway that she says finally scared him off.

"He's a nurse for the past 15 years, and something has never happened," his wife said.

Curtis Clinesmith is a Dallas attorney who serves clients of nursing home abuse. He says families placing loved ones should ask about a facility's video surveillance.

"One of the first things they should ask is if there are cameras available and what their access to that footage is," he said.

In fact, Modern Senior Living staff say video from a hallway confirmed Nwokori was in the victim's room when he shouldn't have been the night of the assault.

Texas gives families even more rights. In 2001, it became the first state to allow video monitoring in nursing home rooms.

"They can certainly put a camera in their loved one's room and that sometimes acts as a deterrent," said Clinesmith.

It could be an extra layer of defense when a family member is the most vulnerable.

Copyright 2016 WFAA


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