Texas native travels to the bottom of the world

Texas native travels to the bottom of the world

Credit: Lisa Quates / KENS 5 viewer

Quates works for Best Recycling, supporting the National Science Foundation, at the largest community station in Antarctica. It's located at the southern tip of Ross Island, just 850 miles north of the South Pole, according to the US Antarctic Program.

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by Andrew Delgado / Kens5.com

khou.com

Posted on December 31, 2013 at 5:04 PM

Updated Wednesday, Jan 1 at 12:37 PM

SAN ANTONIO, Texas -- Local resident Lisa Quates is currently working at the bottom of the world. No, really. She's at McMurdo Station in Antarctica.

Quates works for Best Recycling, supporting the National Science Foundation, at the largest community station in Antarctica. It's located at the southern tip of Ross Island, just 850 miles north of the South Pole, according to the US Antarctic Program

Mobile users: Click here to view the slideshow.

"The sun is so close," Quates said. "On a 30-degree day, it feels hot to us."

The San Antonio native has had an arctic blast (pun intended) taking pictures of emperor penguins, glaciers, Skua birds and Mt. Arabus.

Quates was affected by the government shutdown earlier this year. She was in New Zealand -- which is 'the route to the ice' as they call it -- when the company Quates works for handed her a pink slip and sent her packing back to the states.

Then, as we all know, the government opened again and Quates and her colleagues were re-hired and sent on their way to the arctic.

"I was lucky enough to fly back to New Zealand again," Quates told KENS 5. "I finally arrived in Antarctica on Oct. 31, when I was supposed to be here on Oct. 10."

Quates asked KENS 5 to share her photos with her San Antonio family.

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