Gay rights advocates: DOMA ruling sparks push for change in Texas

Gay rights advocates: DOMA ruling sparks push for change in Texas

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‪U.S. Rep. Joaquin Castro, right‬: ‪“As we celebrate a victory for equality today, we are reminded that there is still a lot of work to ensure we can celebrate equality in America every day. From protecting the right to vote to ensuring that women have the right to make their own health decisions in Texas and across our country, I will continue to stand up for what makes this nation great.‬"

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by Freddy Hunt / Kens5.com

khou.com

Posted on June 27, 2013 at 8:17 AM

Updated Wednesday, Jan 8 at 7:04 PM

SAN ANTONIO -- The Supreme Court's decision to strike down key parts of the Defense of Marriage Act and to pass on California's Proposition 8 was a huge victory for gay rights advocates nationwide.

In San Antonio and throughout Texas, however, it was a gift with strings attached -- a reminder of the work left ahead in the Lone Star State.

By striking down DOMA, the Supreme Court has paved the way for same-sex couples whose marriages are recognized in their states to collect the same federal benefits as heterosexual married couples.

Texas, of course, is not one of the 13 states where same-sex marriage is legal. But to many gay couples, gay rights advocates and lawmakers, Wednesday's ruling is evidence of progressive values sweeping the nation.

One San Antonio man at a gay rights rally outside the Bexar County Courthouse described the ruling as putting the movement "on top of the mountain. And now we can just charge down it."

U.S. Senator Ted Cruz issued a statement on Wednesday blasting the Supreme Court for substituting its own views of public policy for the democratically expressed will of voters.

"The family is the fundamental building block of society, and I strongly support traditional marriage between one man and one woman. The voters of California made that same choice, until the courts improperly substituted their preferences for those of the people," according to the statement.

In regard to the ruling on Proposition 8, ‪Steve Heinrich, ‬treasurer of the ‪Bexar County Republican Part‬y, also thought the democratic voting process was not upheld by the high court.

‪"I thought we lived in a representative democracy where people got to decide things by a majority vote. And I don't understand why people in California don't have that right. ... Whether I agreed or disagreed with Proposition 8 has nothing to do with it. ... If attitudes or opinions change, that's why we have ballot boxes."‬

Plenty of politicians, including San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro, and gay rights supporters outside of the Bexar County Courthouse also had plenty to say.

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