Border children to be housed in North Texas schools, warehouse

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by DEMOND FERNANDEZ / WFAA

WFAA

Posted on July 4, 2014 at 8:56 AM

DALLAS – A list of possible housing facilities for 2,000 migrant children coming from the border was announced by Dallas County leaders on Thursday. 

County Judge Clay Jenkins says, so far, a federal vetting team has identified three viable locations out of more than a dozen options.
 
The three locations under consideration include two closed schools and a warehouse owned by Dallas’ Parkland Hospital. That building is just off Butler Street, behind the new Parkland. A second location is Hulcy Middle School on South Polk Street in Dallas, and a third possible facility is Grand Prairie’s Lamar School on Walnut Street.
 
Elected officials and agencies partnering in the search attended a closed door meeting at Friendship West Baptist Church Thursday afternoon. Attendees say they were briefed on the status of selecting temporary shelter sites for thousands of children who are currently being detained at holding facilities along the border.
 
Judge Jenkins said the options the team is working with has adequate cafeteria, dormitory and exercise space for the children.
 
Community groups, church groups and non-profit agencies in the Oak Cliff area spent the morning organizing volunteers to help collect and prepare care packages for the children expected to move into the shelters.
 
"It's a humanitarian effort. It's about human rights,” said Marsha Talley. The local business owner was among nearly 60 concerned neighbors who attended the community meeting.
 
“It's not about politics. It's not about immigration. It's not about that extra stuff. It's about humans," Talley said.
 
Neighbors packed the community room at Southwest Center Mall. They spent about an hour strategizing and planning a donation drive to collect toiletries, bedding and other items they’ve been told those young migrants, who were caught crossing into the country illegally, may need as they are move into temporary shelters.
 
“It's a part of our philosophy to help people who need it,” said Judy Watkins of the Universalist Unitarian Chuck of Oak Cliff. “This is really important."
 
Community members in Oak Cliff say they will begin collecting blankets, pillows, hygiene packs, socks, and underwear for boys and girls between the ages of 12 and 17. Those items may be dropped off at the community room at Southwest Center Mall beginning July 16.
 

 

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