The final hours of 2016 presidential campaign

DALLAS, Texas - In the final hours of the 2016 presidential campaign, there were concerts, rallies and a parade in Chicago to the polls on the final night of early voting in that city.

In Philadelphia, thousands of Democrats crowded in front of Independence Hall.

"Hillary's candidacy is a candidacy based on intelligence, experience, preparation," said Bruce Springsteen.

He and Jon Bon Jovi headlined a concert that also featured President Barack Obama and the First Lady, President Bill Clinton, Chelsea Clinton, and the nominee herself.

Why Pennsylvania? There's no early voting in this state so Democrats hope for a big turnout Tuesday.

"I will be a president for all Americans. Democrats, Republicans, independents, not just the people who support me in this election – everyone,” said Hillary Clinton, D-Presidential Nominee.

Even in Dallas, Democratic volunteers called hundreds of voters on Monday night who did not go to the polls early.

“I know for those of us who early vote and we're excited to get that vote cast, there are actually people who tell me I just like the feeling of voting on Election Day,” said Carol Donovan, chairwoman of the Dallas County Democratic Party.

"This race is on. We are leading in one national poll after the other and it is wheel to wheel here in New Hampshire and we're going to sprint to the finish and take the checkered flag," said Gov. Mike Pence, R-Vice Presidential Nominee, to supporters in New Hampshire.

Former Gov. John Sununu, who was also President George H.W. Bush’s Chief of Staff, helped rally Republicans in his home state on election eve.

"I want the entire corrupt Washington establishment to hear these words from all of us. When we win tomorrow we are going to drain the swamp," said Donald Trump, R-Presidential Nominee.

In Dallas County, 43 percent of registered voters have already cast ballots. Volunteers at the local GOP headquarters spent Monday night trying to reach the other half.

MORE: Election coverage 

Dallas County Republican Party Chairman Phillip Huffines was asked whether fear and hate of each party’s candidate is a primary catalyst in turning out people to vote.

“I think it's probably a little bit of both, but what's mainly driving Republicans is we have great candidates running all across the board," explained Huffines.

Both sides claim momentum moving into the final hours before voting ends.

On Tuesday, Florida, North Carolina, Ohio and Nevada are four of the battleground states that both presidential campaigns are focusing on to get them over the 270 electoral votes needed to become president.

Copyright 2016 WFAA


JOIN THE CONVERSATION

To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the
Conversation Guidelines and FAQs

Leave a Comment