Video Game Reverses Some Effects of Brain Aging

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Associated Press

Posted on September 4, 2013 at 7:01 PM

Updated Thursday, Sep 5 at 9:02 AM

Researchers at the UC-San Francisco have been testing a 3D video game they say reverses some of the negative effects of aging on the brain. The findings, published in 'Nature' provide scientific support to the field of brain fitness. (Sept. 4)

AP -- AP CLIENTS ONLY

SAN FRANCISCO - Aug. 29, 2013

1. Medium: Anguera watching Linsley playing NeuroRacer

2. Tight: Laptop screen with NeuroRacer game starting

3. Tight: Hands operating joystick

4. Tight: Linsley's face as she plays

5. Tight: Screen with Neuroracer

6. Wide: Neuroscience building at UCSF Mission Bay campus

7. Medium: Gazzaley showing brain on computer screen

8. Tight: Brain image on computer screen

9. Medium: Joaquin Anguera playing brain training game on iPad

10. Tight: Hands playing brain training on iPad

11. SOUNDBITE: Joaquin Anguera, neuroscience researcher , UCSF

12. Medium: Ann Linsley starting to play video game

13. Tight: Screen with Neuroracer

14. SOUNDBITE: Adam Gazzaley, neuroscience lab director, University of California, San Francisco (UCSF)

15. Tight: Linsley's face as she plays

16. Tight: Hands operating joystick

17. SOUNDBITE: Ann Linsley, study participant, University of California, San Francisco

18. Tight: Hands on joystick

19. Medium: UCSF research participant wearing head cap that records brain activity (not for Neuroracer study)

20. Medium: Head cap on man while he plays video game

VOICE OVER SCRIPT:

65-YEAR-OLD ANN LINSLEY DOESN'T LOOK LIKE A TYPICAL GAMER. AND THE VIDEO GAME SHE'S PLAYING ISN'T THE LATEST BLOCKBUSTER RELEASE FROM THE MULTI-BILLION DOLLAR INDUSTRY.

THIS 3-D DRIVING GAME COMES FROM THE MINDS OF RESEARCHERS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA--SAN FRANCISCO studying brain fitness.

THE GAME'S DEVELOPERS SAY IT ACTUALLY REVERSES SOME NEGATIVES EFFECTS OF AGING ON THE BRAIN.

SOUNDBITE: Joaquin Anguera, neuroscience researcher, UCSF

"This provides a little more validity to the idea of the brain being plastic. And further more it means that we could potentially create better interventions."

PARTICIPANTS DRIVE A CAR DOWN A virtual ROAD--THEY ALSO HAVE to PUSH A BUTTON WHEN A SPECIFIC TYPE OF SIGN POPS UP. Those in THE STUDY SHOWED IMPROVEMENTS IN MULTI-TASKING WITHIN THE GAME.

SOUNDBITE: Adam Gazzaley, neuroscience lab director, UCSF

"But we also found that other cognitive control abilIties that we did not directly train - their sustained attention and their working memory abilities - also improved after game play."

LINSLEY SAYS HER ABILITY TO MULTI-TASK HAS DECLINED AS SHE'S GOTTEN OLDER.

SOUNDBITE: Ann Linsley, study participant, UCSF

"When we're all thinking about how can we improve our lives and stay healthy and in touch and focused and be able to accomplish things. So if this can really help us, it's great."

AND RESEARCH LIKE THIS COULD HOLD PROMISE FOR LINSLEY AND MILLIONS OF SENIORS hoping to slow the aging process.

MATT FRIEDMAN. ASSOCIATED PRESS.

(****END****)

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