New study outlines teens' worst driving habits as deadly crashes spike

The number of teenagers involved in deadly car crashes is rising for the first time in nearly a decade. New data from federal regulators reveal a 10-percent increase last year in teen driving deaths. Teens are more than one-and-a-half times more likely th

The number of teenagers involved in deadly car crashes is rising for the first time in nearly a decade. New data from federal regulators reveal a 10-percent increase last year in teen driving deaths. Teens are more than one-and-a-half times more likely than adults to be involved in a deadly crash.

Eight in 10 adults between ages 35 to 55 admit to driving while talking on the phone – more than teens. About half of teens and adults drive 15 mph over the speed limit. But when you add inexperience, speed and distraction, you get deadly results for the younger drivers, reports CBS News correspondent Kris Van Cleave. 

Donovan Tessmer was about to start his senior year of high school. While out with friends, the teen’s girlfriend was speeding, lost control and hit a tree. Donovan wasn’t wearing a seat belt. He was ejected and killed instantly.

For the complete story, visit CBSNews.com.


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