Neighbors return to homes after series of detonations by FBI in suspect's home

Andrew Schneck, a 25-year-old Houston man, is in federal custody for allegedly planning to blow up a Confederate statue in Hermann Park.

HOUSTON - KHOU 11 got a bird’s eye view of the detonations that took place near Rice Village on Monday. It's all part of a raid on the home of a man, who police say was caught trying to blow up a confederate statue in Hermann Park.

Monday night, federal agents stood guard outside this home, but Albans Road is open. On the street, is the home where investigators say Andrew Schneck, 25, would conduct his chemistry experiments. Neighbors told KHOU 11 they had no idea.

"Nobody I think over here knows them very well, they are pretty much to themselves," said Cristin Dickerson, a neighbor.

It's where they say Schneck lived, seen in this yearbook picture from Memorial High School. Now, he's in jail accused of trying to blow up a confederate statue in Hermann Park.


"He may have heard something on the news about Charlottesville that made him think 'I'm going to do something,' I don't know," said Travis Broesche, a neighbor.

Saturday night a park ranger noticed him kneeling in the bushes in front of General Dowling's monument. Investigators say he was carrying a timer, wires and a box full of explosives.

Back near his home, neighbors took pictures of a team in full tactical gear unloading on the street. Even prominent defense attorney Dick DeGuerin evacuated.

"I was out walking with the dog and a couple of fire captains came up and said, 'Listen, we're going to ask you to leave your home right away,'" said DeGuerin.

By Monday night, after a series of detonations, police allowed neighbors to return.

"The concern is he had hazardous materials, it wasn't just here, it was 3 different residences last time," said Dickerson.

The last time in 2013. Investigators raided Schneck's home then too. He plead guilty to storing dangerous chemicals, but neighbors still question how he got off probation early.

"And he gets $160,000 fine and 5 years probation, there's something wrong there and that the parents weren't monitoring," said Dickerson.

The park ranger was praised by the city and told KHOU 11 she didn't want any attention. As for Schneck, he's due in court on Thursday.

He's being represented by the same attorney who got him off probation.

© 2017 KHOU-TV


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