Telling lies is bad in more ways than one

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by Mia Gradney/ KHOU 11 News

khou.com

Posted on September 17, 2012 at 1:05 PM

Updated Monday, Sep 17 at 1:49 PM

HOUSTON—No matter where you’re from or what you do, at some time or another, we all tell lies. Some of us fib to get out of something.

“It may be somebody asks you to do a favor and you’ve got to lie. You might lie and say I’ve got something to do,” said Daryl Williams.

Many of us told little so-called “white lies” when we were growing up.

“When I was five years old my mother said not to have any cake and eat chocolate ice cream at a friend’s house. Well, I did and she asked me, I had chocolate all over my mouth,” said Holli Blaze.

For some, lying is just a part of life, but in excess can be hazardous to your health.

“Lying would be one unnecessary stress,”explained Dr. Daniela White. "We all have to go through exams, life changes and changes at work, but we don’t have to lie.”

White confirms what researchers with the University of Notre Dame have determined; people who lie less experience better physical and mental health than those who commonly deceive.

“The correlation between high cortisol levels and high blood pressure, or increased body mass index,” says Dr. White. “They’re more prone to obesity and type II diabetes.”

Nothing illustrates the effects of lying on the body better than perhaps a polygraph test. The tests measure different physiological changes. John S. Swartz is a criminal polygraph examiner who conducts tests for the district courts.

“We’ll see changes in the breathing, We may see apnea, We’ll see hyperventilation, complete cessation of breathing,” Swartz said. “We’ll see what’s called reaction and relief when we see a cardiovascular response. Often it is simultaneous and all at the same time.”

All that can’t be good for your health. Still, you’re not likely telling an intricately woven lie that a hardened criminal would tell. But it is about the cover-up, no matter how big or small.

“The more you lie, the more you’re going to lie in the future,” says Dr. White. “I don’t think the stress necessarily comes from the first lie but probably comes from covering up.”

So just do what you know is right. Tell the truth to ensure you’re less stressed and healthy and happy too.

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