More than 1k cases under review after Precinct 4 evidence destroyed

KHOU 11 political expert Bob Stein says the investigation into more than one thousand cases where evidence was destroyed could hurt republicans running for re-election.

HARRIS COUNTY, Texas - More than a thousand cases are under review after evidence was destroyed in Harris County Precinct 4.

Now, the investigation is becoming a political issue ahead of Election Day.

The three politicians involved are Harris County District Attorney Devon Anderson, Sheriff Ron Hickman and Precinct 4 Constable Mark Herman. All are republicans and all are up for re-election this November.

We've already seen this week a Democrat challenger using the evidence dump as ammunition.

"I think every law enforcement agency knows they're the keepers of the evidence," said Anderson.

It's a "blame game" over missing evidence between D.A. Anderson and Constable Herman.

"I've only been Constable here for a year and it was time to do something with the property room," said Herman.

Even the man who held the position before is getting questions.

"I'm aware of there is a single incident where the property was improperly disposed of," said Ron Hickman, Harris County Sheriff.

With the November election around the corner, the D.A.'s Democrat challenger is weighing in.

"We have an enormous civil rights, mass civil rights violation that may have occurred," said Kim Ogg, Democrat candidate for Harris County District Attorney.

"Now, I think what you are seeing is white suburban voters looking at...is this the way we want to run our criminal justice system?" said Bob Stein, KHOU 11 Political Expert.

Stein says the fallout could hurt Republicans running for re-election. In a presidential election year, Stein says the top of the GOP ticket isn't helping.

"Donald Trump is not doing as well in Harris County," said Stein. "That begins to erode the down ballet races."

He adds this missing evidence is the last thing Republicans need, in an election no party wants to lose.

"This is 2016, 2018 comes up that's an extremely important year, it's the year before the census and it's the year before redistricting," said Stein.

That's when the boundaries for our congressional districts are redrawn, which controls who can vote and ultimately who gets elected.


JOIN THE CONVERSATION

To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the
Conversation Guidelines and FAQs

Leave a Comment