Study: Coffee drinkers live longer

Study: Coffee drinkers live longer

Surprising your Valentine first thing in the morning with a bouquet of flowers is nice. But first thing in the morning, my wife doesn't appreciate anything until after she gets a cup of coffee.

I went to Olmos Perk Coffee Bar and found the perfect solution: a heart-filled latte. Iris DeAndrade is a barista with some major skill, and she's up to a challenge. Just ask for a little love in your drink and she'll try her best. She nailed it with my raspberry mocha.

"It takes a little more effort than just buying a box of chocolates," she said, explaining why a hot drink is the perfect Valentine's Day treat. "There's a whole socialization aspect to it. And they get to watch it being made. It's a special little treat."

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Associated Press

Posted on May 17, 2012 at 3:34 PM

Updated Friday, Nov 8 at 7:05 AM

MILWAUKEE -- One of life’s simple pleasures just got a little sweeter. After years of waffling research on coffee and health, even some fear that java might raise the risk of heart disease, a big study finds the opposite: Coffee drinkers are a little more likely to live longer. Regular or decaf doesn’t matter.

The study of 400,000 people is the largest ever done on the issue, and the results should reassure any coffee lovers who think it’s a guilty pleasure that may do harm.

"Our study suggests that’s really not the case," said lead researcher Neal Freedman of the National Cancer Institute. "There may actually be a modest benefit of coffee drinking."

No one knows why. Coffee contains a thousand things that can affect health, from helpful antioxidants to tiny amounts of substances linked to cancer. The most widely studied ingredient—caffeine—didn’t play a role in the new study’s results.

It’s not that earlier studies were wrong. There is evidence that coffee can raise LDL, or bad cholesterol, and blood pressure at least short-term, and those in turn can raise the risk of heart disease.

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