Trial date set for former HPD officers charged in videotaped beating of teenage burglar

Trial date set for former HPD officers charged in videotaped beating of teenage burglar

Trial date set for former HPD officers charged in videotaped beating of teenage burglar

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by KHOU.com staff, Associated Press

khou.com

Posted on March 20, 2013 at 2:06 PM

Updated Wednesday, Mar 20 at 2:08 PM

HOUSTON—A trial date has been set for three former Houston Police Department officers who are charged in the videotaped beating of a 15-year-old burglar.

Phil Bryan, Raad Hassan and Drew Ryser are due in court on April 29. A judge denied a previous request for a venue change.

The three men were among six HPD officers who were captured on surveillance cameras in March of 2010 arresting Holley. After Holley jumped over the hood of a police car, he fell to the ground and put his hands behind his head. Several officers pounced on Holley and proceeded to kick and hit him both before and after he was handcuffed.

Once released, the now infamous surveillance video caused a firestorm of controversy.

Civil rights leaders and Holley supporters rallied and protested for justice. The incident also resulted in the firing of seven officers, four of whom were charged.

Ex-officer Andrew Blomberg was the first to stand trial for misdemeanor official oppression. His defense attorney, Dick DeGuerin, told the jury during opening statements that Blomberg was a “hero” who was simply trying to help restrain a burglar who was resisting arrest. A jury in May of 2012 acquitted Blomberg of the charges.

Two of the Houston police officers who were fired, Lewis Childress and Guadencio Saucedo, regained their jobs through appeals. Neither was charged.

Holley was convicted of burglary in juvenile court and put on probation for the 2010 case. He was arrested again in June 2012 for allegedly burglarizing another home with three of his friends.

The teen pleaded guilty for that offense on January 9, 2013 and his sentencing date was set for March 14. But when he arrived at the Harris County courthouse to hear his judgment, he was taken into custody for an outstanding warrant.

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