Repeat offender shares her story before heading to prison for deadly DWI crash

Print
Email
|

by KENS5.com

khou.com

Posted on May 15, 2014 at 8:44 AM

SAN ANTONIO -- A Bexar County judge sentenced 32-year-old Amy Humphreys to 15 years for the drunk driving death of a San Antonio teenager. Before heading off to prison she spoke with KENS 5 about the crime she committed.
 
"I was devastated,” Humphreys said. “I couldn't believe I could be the cause of somebody losing their life." She said she doesn't want anyone's sympathy but she does hope people will pay close attention to her cautionary tale.
 
"I just remember being loaded into the ambulance and taken to the hospital where they told me he passed away," Humphreys said.
 
According to Humphreys, not a day goes by that she doesn't relive that tragic night in her mind.
 
February 19, 2013 started uneventfully Humphreys said. She went to work and then afterwards she said she had a few drinks and dinner with friends. "I don't recall having so many drinks to become intoxicated to that point," said Humphreys.
 
San Antonio Police said that night she pulled out of a parking at speeds of more than 50 mph, hopped a curb, and hit 19-year-old Cedrych Carrisalez.
 
Carrisalez was jogging that night with a friend along Mulberry Avenue, not far from Trinity University.
 
"I'm not a bad person,” Humphreys said. “It's a terrible situation. I have nothing but remorse. I can't explain what happened that day."
 
"It's been devastating for everyone involved in this,” Gayle Freunscht, Amy's mother, said. “It's a tragedy and nightmare you don't wake up from.”
 
Freunscht said she loves and supports her daughter, but both women recognize Amy must pay the consequences for killing a young man.
 
Humphreys was sentenced to 15 years in prison as part of a plea deal but not before Cedrych Carrisalez' family got a chance to tell her about the unbearable and never-ending pain she created in their lives through their victims impact statement.
 
"On the way to the hospital, I held his hand, kissed him, told him that I loved him and that dad's here and hoped that he might hear me,” Helen Carrisalez, Cedrych Carrisalez’s mother, said. “At the same time, I prayed he wasn't in pain that he would be fine."
 
Oscar Carrisalez is a paramedic who was working the night of the accident. When he heard about it on his scanner, he rushed to the scene where his son was dying. "I was living a nightmare,” an emotional Oscar Carrisalez, said. “I couldn't even entertain the thought that I'd lose him."
 
The Carrisalez family did not want to be interviewed on camera for this story, but said over the phone, there are days they wish the worst for Humphreys and other days they lean on their faith to help them cope.
 
Although Humphreys' punishment won't bring Cedrych back, the Carrisalez family said they hope prison serves as a strong reminder that if someone chooses to drink and drive, there are consequences.
 
"Enforcement and the courts can only do so much," Susan Pamerleau, Bexar County Sheriff, said. She speaks to groups regularly about the dangers of drunk driving. After our interview with Amy, she wanted to talk to us about what she calls a drunk driving epidemic in Bexar County.
 
According to the Bexar County District Attorney's office, last year, there were 7,712 total DWI arrests, about 200 fewer than the year before when 7,920 people were arrested. So far this year, there are 2,789.
 
In 2013, there were 14 convictions for intoxication manslaughter or felony murder in Bexar County.
 
The District Attorney's DWI Task Force has logged two convictions for DWI cases ending in manslaughter or murder so far this year. They said they're about to take 4 more cases to trial for fatalities in the next month and a half.
 
"We've got to start addressing this issue before someone's arrested and that's a community effort,”  Sheriff Pamerleau said. “We've got to get a hold of this at the very beginning, whether it's a family member, an employer, a friend. We've got to have some means of bringing attention, to have interventions."
 
She said early intervention is the only real solution to drunk driving. It wasn't available to help repeat DWI offender, Amy Humphreys, but Humphreys and her mother hope by sharing their story, lives will be saved in the future.
 
"I just want to do whatever I can to be involved and to help because I am also a mother and I am against drunk driving as well," Freunscht said.
 
"I hope in the future to speak to old people and young people, everybody, to get more education on what can happen... that drinking and driving is such a dangerous thing," Humphreys said. Humphreys plans to continue her Alcoholics Anonymous therapy while incarcerated and hopes to get involved in speaking to groups about the consequences of drinking and driving.
 
Humphreys must serve 8 years before she is eligible for parole.

Print
Email
|