NTSB: Asiana flight crew 'over-relied' on automated systems

NTSB: Asiana flight crew 'over-relied' on automated systems

Credit: Getty Images

A Boeing 777 airplane lies burned near the runway after it crash-landed at San Francisco International Airport July 6, 2013 in San Francisco, California. An Asiana Airlines passenger aircraft coming from Seoul, South Korea crashed while landing, killing two people and injuring scores of others.

Print
Email
|

by Bart Jansen, USA TODAY

khou.com

Posted on June 24, 2014 at 10:46 AM

WASHINGTON — Federal investigators began reviewing their report Tuesday about the fatal crash of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 in San Francisco, saying they would make numerous recommendations to prevent future crashes.

"Our goal in this investigation is to help prevent similar accidents in the future," said Christopher Hart, acting chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board. "In this instance, the flight crew over-relied on automated systems that they did not understand."

The board is meeting to determine the probable cause of the crash July 6, 2013, and make recommendations to avoid another. The crash killed three people and injured 187, out of 307 aboard the flight from Seoul.

Investigators have already said the Boeing 777 was flying lower and slower than intended when it slammed into the seawall at the end of the runway, spun around and burst into flames.

While Asiana acknowledged the pilots were flying too slow and too low, there is a dispute between the airline and Boeing about why that happened.

Asiana cited "inconsistencies" with the autothrottle that led pilots to believe it would maintain the plane's speed after some adjustments in the autopilot, when in fact the engines were idling in "hold" mode.

But Boeing said the plane was functioning as expected and "did not contribute to the accident," and that the pilots should have aborted the landing when they realized things were awry and tried again.

Other facets of the investigation will deal with surviving a crash. One of the fatalities, 16-year-old Ye Meng Yuan, was run over by a fire truck after being thrown from the plane. And two of the plane's emergency slides deployed into the cabin, complicating the evacuation.

Print
Email
|