Charlie Rose denies 'wrongdoings' as three CBS employees come forward

Three CBS employees are accusing Charlie Rose of sexual harassment during his time at the network, the news outlet reports itself in a new story published Wednesday.

CBS found that Rose's alleged pattern of misconduct extended beyond 2011, the timeframe previously reported by the Washington Post. The newspaper published a story Monday featuring the accounts of eight women from his PBS show, who reported harassment including nudity, groping and explicit phone calls.

"We learned about these cases not from the HR department, but from our own investigation of his behavior," the network noted in the story.

Of the three CBS employees, all of whom spoke anonymously, one says she's not ready for details of her allegations to become public, while the other two told similar stories to those published in the Washington Post and Business Insider on Monday. The two accusers both described Rose groping them at work-related events, with one claiming he whispered a sexual innuendo in her ear.

Following Monday's stories, CBS fired Charlie Rose and PBS dropped his long-running interview show on Tuesday.

Wednesday's CBS This Morning, which Rose previously co-hosted, featured footage of comments he made to TMZ on Monday, defending his actions: "They're not wrongdoings."

His statement was at odds with his earlier apology published in the Post story, in which he claimed he "behaved insensitively at times, and I accept responsibility for that, though I do not believe that all of these allegations are accurate."

In his internal email announcing Rose's firing which was later tweeted and provided to USA TODAY on Tuesday, CBS News president David Rhodes stressed that despite the anchor's journalistic contributions to the network, "There is absolutely nothing more important, in this or any organization than ensuring a safe, professional workplace." 

He continued, "CBS News has reported on extraordinary revelations at other media companies this year and last, Our credibility in that reporting requires credibility managing basic standards of behavior. That is why we have taken these actions."

Rhodes noted, "I’m deeply disappointed and angry that people were victimized — and that even people not connected with these events could see their hard work undermined.  If all of us commit to the best behavior and the best work – that is what we can be known for."

The CBS News story included a statement from the network's communication office, saying: "This is new information. Beyond that, we have no comment at this time." 

Rose's representative did not immediately respond to a request for comment regarding the new allegatiion. 

© 2017 USATODAY.COM


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