Clooney talks Hollywood, humanity in Houston

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by Shern-Min Chow / KHOU 11 News

khou.com

Posted on May 3, 2012 at 11:00 PM

HOUSTON—Hollywood heartthrob George Clooney was in Houston Thursday night wowing fans – women and men alike. He spoke at the Wortham Theatre as a part of the Brilliance lecture series. His topic? Hollywood and humanity.

It was a simple setting, two chairs on the stage. Socialite Lynn Wyatt asked the questions. The Oscar winner answered them, chatting for about an hour. Clooney spoke about his life "really pretty normal," having Bell’s Palsy and enduring the "humiliation of being 14 and having half your face paralyzed" and making the movie "Good Night and Good Luck" as a tribute to his father, a news anchorman.

Clooney spoke about being envious of his cousins who lived in Hollywood (his Aunt was singer Rose Mary Clooney.) He joked he grew up in Kentucky, where his mother literally made his clothes. He described "hell" as when your mother takes you to the pattern store and makes you stand there while she holds a leisure suit pattern up to you.

The international film star also recounted the story of how he adopted his dog, a stray from a local pound. The dog was brought to his house for an adoption interview of sorts. To seal the deal, Clooney swears he ran to the kitchen, grabbed two meatballs and rubbed them up and down his legs. When he opened the front door, the dog loved him. The dog lives with Clooney today.

The social activist also spoke about the human rights atrocities in Darfur. Refugees from the Sudan were in attendance, and believe the star’s support has done much to highlight the crisis there. Clooney was recently arrested at a protest in front of the Sudanese Embassy, along with his father Nick Clooney and Houston Congressman Al Green.

Other highlights of his talk: "If you’re gonna get arrested, do it with you dad. You can’t get in trouble." His motto? "Be the guy your dog thinks you are."

One of his big regrets is not learning a second language or a musical instrument. He said that training can help you with learning other versions of the same skill.

 

 

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